Steve Nash on Mike D’Antoni’s Genius

When I presented for Positive Coaching Alliance working with Ray Lokar, he often said that coaches work in the fish bowl; everyone watches the coach from the outside, often without knowledge of the environment, but the coach always is in front of an audience. This pressure from the fish bowl shapes many of the negative behaviors that we see from coaches: I once watched a coach who would yell loud enough for everyone in the audience to hear him, “Player, we practiced that yesterday for 20 minutes. How can you make that mistake?” There was no information; in essence, he was saying, “Look, I did everything that I could at practice and it is your child who is messing up, not me.” I was appalled, but I see this behavior to some degree fairly often.  […]

Coach development, not coach education or certification

I imagine the following is based directly or indirectly on the writings of Mark O’Sullivan, Mark Upton, Richard Bailey, Stuart Armstrong, and others. If you spend enough time on social media and basketball blogs, someone will suggest that the United States is falling behind in basketball because of a lack of coach education. Now, there Read more about Coach development, not coach education or certification[…]

Luck and landing a college coaching job

Seventeen years after I first was hired as an assistant college basketball coach, I was hired as a part-time head coach at the junior college level. I would like to think that I have earned the opportunity with my work and persistence, but the actual process of landing the job was good fortune and luck. Because many people ask how to get such and such job, here is my story (following my story of how I was hired to coach in Europe). […]

Airplane reads and the goal of coach development

I listened to a podcast last night with a prominent strength and conditioning coach, hosted by another strength and conditioning coach, and the prominent coach boasted about not reading any books on strength and conditioning. Instead, he reads business books to improve his coaching.This is common, if my Twitter feed is any indication, as coaches now gravitate toward business and self-help books.

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What Gets Charted Gets Done

In Arizona our basketball season starts this week with tryouts.  I have been prepping for the past two weeks on material for our annual lock-in where our student-athletes stay in the gym overnight to become immersed in our culture, parent meeting information and the other admin tasks that go along with coaching.  In addition, my wife implored me to clean up our office as my stuff, mainly basketball related, is in stacks everywhere.  While cleaning up the office I came across an article by Jim Burson – Solution Based Basketball about offense.  The biggest takeaway for me was “things that get charted, get done”. […]

My coaching journey

When I conducted coaching clinics in Canada last month, several coaches asked how I ended up different than most coaches. There is, I suppose, a presumption about most coaches implied in that question, and my answer obviously reflected my bias of a stereotypical coach or the representative of most coaches. Despite these implications, I feel confident that people who know me from coaching or my writing about coaching put me towards a different end of a spectrum than most coaches. So, how did I become different? […]

Season Plan: What’s Your Plan For You

Our basketball season will officially begin with tryouts 11/2.  Everyday I have dedicated time to planning tryouts, our weekly practice schedule as well as the admin. tasks that no one likes doing such as ordering items and planning fundraisers.  However, this year I have also completed a Season Health plan for myself.  I got the idea Read more about Season Plan: What’s Your Plan For You[…]