My 2017 Reading List

In the tradition of lists from 2014, 2015, and 2016, here is my reading list for 2017. The Athletic Skills Model: Optimizing Talent Development Through Movement Education – Rene Wormhoudt I admit that I have waited for this book for nearly 5 years and the authors are preaching to the choir. It is a very Read more about My 2017 Reading List[…]

Specialization vs. Generalization

Originally published in Los Angeles Sports & Fitness, July/August 2015.

During their high-school years, I trained two brothers. They were bright and athletic. When I first met them when they were in middle school, they mentioned a desire to play basketball at Stanford University in the future. Despite their similarities, they differed. Everything appeared to be easy for the older brother, whereas the younger brother tended to work harder. The older brother had varied interests, whereas the young brother focused more on basketball. The older brother was regarded as the better player almost until the day that he quit competitive basketball, but it was the younger brother who set records at his university and played professionally. The older brother, when he chose to quit basketball, pursued his other interests in music and found success.  […]

Prioritizing your practice design

“If, for whatever reason, you were only allowed three 15-minute sessions a week, what would you do?”

The question above is from Dan John’s Can You Go? and is related to strength & conditioning, not basketball. However, the question is one for a coach to consider. If restricted to three 15-minute sessions per week, what would you do? […]

Elite Athletes Build Broad-Based Foundations

Originally published in Los Angeles Sports & Fitness, September 2012.

While in Paris, I marveled at the subway system. In the United States, as cities on the west coast attempt to develop subway systems, local governments are caught in a network dilemma: A network improves as more people join the network, but local governments cannot justify the expense to expand without more users. In Paris, subway lines crisscross the city: There was no place that was not easily accessible through the subway and a short walk. This is a mature network; as more people use a particular line, more trains are added, and the line improves in quality and speed. In Los Angeles, the problem with the subway is that the lines do not crisscross the city: Plenty of locations are completely inaccessible by the subway. Due to the inaccessibility, fewer people use the subway; however, to build the additional lines, there has to be a demand: It’s a catch-22.  […]