My 2016 Reading List

In the tradition of lists from 2014 and 2015, here is my reading list for 2016.

The year started with the publication of my latest book, 21st Century Guide to Individual Skill Development. I tired of writing basketball/coaching books and decided to take a stab at fiction. I have written most of a pilot for a TV show, a reality TV show proposal, a documentary proposal, and have worked as a writer and researcher on another documentary. I also started an additional screenplay and a novel, in addition to beginning  another instructional book. Consequently, I read more fiction and books on writing than I did basketball, strength & conditioning, or training books. […]

Learning to relax to improve sports performance

Originally published in Los Angeles Sports & Fitness, May/June 2016

Coaches constantly encourage athletes to relax (often by yelling, which seems contradictory), but rarely does a coach explain or demonstrate relaxation or a process to relax. Encouraging players to relax becomes a throw away; something that everyone says, and everyone assumes the other person understands, but which has virtually no practical meaning.  […]

Improving ankle and hip mobility for better basketball performance

I work with a couple players who are so tight that I don’t know how they even play basketball. Several guys are unable to get into a full squat position. You never play in a full squat in basketball, but the inability shows different issues: tight hips and/or tight ankles. These are problems that affect performance. […]

Developing an elite basketball jump shooter

Shooting is a motor skill despite many experts believing that shooting skill is an innate talent. The concentration when coaching or teaching young shooters is the sport-specific instruction: the elbow, the eyes, the knee bend, etc. When one watches an expert shooter, his technique looks effortless: Even a shooter with an unorthodox technique like Reggie Miller looks effortless when shooting the basketball. Moshe Feldenkrais wrote, “Light and easy movements are good ones, as a rule” (p. 86). Look at Kevin Durant’s effortless release: […]